Category Archives: Podcasts

Episode 215 – Dealing with Rude, Mean and Hostile People

The Hostile Prospect

This person disagrees with you and may even actively work against you. For a hostile prospect, use these techniques:

·         Find common beliefs and establish a common ground.

·         Use appropriate humor to break the ice.

·         Don’t start the presentation with an attack on their position.

·         You are only trying to persuade on one point; don’t talk about   anything else that could trigger disagreement.

·         Because of your differences, they will question your credibility.    Increase your credibility with studies from experts or anything that will support your claim.

·         They will try to find reasons to not like you; don’t give them any.

·         Don’t tell them you are going to try to persuade them.

·         Express that you are looking for a win-win outcome rather than a win-lose situation.

·         Show them you’ve done your homework.

·         Respect their feelings, values, and integrity.

·         Use logical reasoning as clearly and as carefully as possible.

·         Use the Law of Connectivity and the Law of Balance.

BLACK FRIDAY FREEBIE

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Episode 214 – The Brick Wall of Resistance Part 1

On this episode Kurt discusses the geeky article of the biggest causes of anxiety. Article here. He also discusses the blunder of the week that happened to him at a burger joint in Southern California. And why first impressions really are important. He also discusses the brick wall of resistance and how we sometimes create it.

Has this ever happened to you? You enter a retail store and you’re approached by a sharply dressed persuader. You are interested in buying, but the salesperson is a little aggressive. You get an alarming feeling in the pit of your stomach and then do what many of your customers do to you. You lie!

You say, “I’m just looking; I’ll come backlater,” or “It’s too expensive,” or “I have to talk to my spouse before I decide.” What you’re really thinking is “I don’t like this guy,” or “I don’t trust her,” or “Something didn’t feel quite right.” In the end, you never go back to this store, you never recommend it, and neither the store owner nor the persuader ever knows why.

This obstacle is truly a silent persuasion killer. Most people will never say anything to you to alert you to the fact they are feeling this way. They are more comfortable lying to you?so they don’t hurt your feelings. They walk away and simply never deal with you again. The reason this obstacle is such a killer is because we don’t even realize we’re doing it.

 What do you do to overcome this tendency? Your persuasion attempts must be nonthreatening and very natural. Forget loud and flashy. That strategy only encourages resistance. And most definitely forget about high pressure. Not only does that solidify the wall of resistance in that particular moment, but the wall will increase in size. When people feel they have been pressured, bullied, or coerced into buying or doing something they don’t need or want, they are resentful. They will never do business with you again.

 The moment people sense that you are attempting to persuade them, the brick wall increases in size and strength, and they will resist you. To counter this tendency, persuasion and sales must take place below the conscious radar.

 Great persuaders have cultivated a sixth sense when it comes to the “push and pull” aspect of persuasion. You must encourage without pushing. Entice, but don’t ensnare. You have to sense and then predict, based upon knowledge, instinct, experience, and nonverbal cues, what you can do and how your audience will respond. With this sensitivity, which you can learn, there won’t be any smacking head first into the brick wall of resistance.

Offer of the week: lawsofinfluence.com 

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Episode 213 – How to Sell the Way Your Customers Want to Buy – Interview with Kristin Zhivago

Join Kurt as he interviews Kristin Zhivago. Kristin is president of Zhivago Partners, a digital marketing management company, and the author of the book, Roadmap to Revenue: How to Sell the Way Your Customers Want to Buy. Kristin was one of the first to identify selling as a matter of supporting the customer’s buying process.

Kristen and Kurt discuss:

  • Biggest blunder people make today in sales & influence
  • Tips for entrepreneurs
  • How to think like a buyer
  • How to deal with a prospect who has found wrong information or too much information from the internet
  • How to not bore your prospects
  • What questions to ask to get your customers to buy
  • Current trends in online marketing

And much more!

Content Marketing: How to go from Creep to Friend

Why do they need or want what you’re selling? It is never, ever what you assume. Interviewing thousands of customers for my clients convinced me of that by the second interview. What roadblocks must be overcome, in their own minds, before they can reach for their wallet? Who do they have to convince? What else have they looked at, and why did they reject it (so far)? What makes them nervous about buying from you, because of their past experiences and because of the things you said – or didn’t say – on your website? What is the question they wish everyone would answer, but no one does?

All of us marketers can easily suffer from a problem that is similar to the one salespeople have. Most salespeople listen only closely enough so that they can talk. In other words, their goal is to talk, not to listen. They listen so they can talk. Similarly, marketers gather facts about their customers so they can prove to their bosses that they “get” those customers, and so they can write. They are more excited about the output than the input, just like salespeople, and just like the graph above makes clear.

For more information about Kristin visit: zhivagopartners.com

Offer of the week: Find our your Persuasion IQ & get a free digital copy of my best-selling book! www.takeyouriq.com

 

Episode 212 – Psychology of Making Your Prospects Wait

On this episode Kurt discusses the blunder and ninja of the day, and the psychology of waiting and whether or not is a good or bad thing and if it affects your ability to persuade.

Atmosphere can also include the tension in the air. Is there a rush, or are customers relaxed? What type of climate are you trying to create? Do you want a quick, fast decision, or do you want your customers to feel comfortable enough to stay for a while?

An interesting study on what happens when you create an atmosphere of being rushed can be seen in the following example:

Princeton University psychologists John Darley and Daniel Batson wanted to see how students would respond if they were in a situation replicating the biblical account of the Good Samaritan.  As the story goes, a band of thieves beat, robbed, and left a man traveling alone by the roadside to die. A devout priest and a reputable Levite passed by.

 Neither of the men stopped to help the dying man. Finally, a Samaritan, stopped to help him. The Samaritan bound up his wounds, took him to an inn, and even paid the innkeeper to care for him until he returned.

Darley and Batson asked seminarians on a one-on-one basis to prepare and present a short speech on an assigned biblical topic. The test was set up so that on their way to the location where they would deliver their speech, each student would cross a man slumped over, coughing and groaning.

Which students would actually stop and help? Before preparing their speeches, the students filled out a questionnaire asking why they had chosen to study theology. Then a variety of speech topics were assigned, including the story of the Good Samaritan. As the students were leaving to deliver their speeches, some were told, “You’d better hurry. They were expecting you about three minutes ago.” Others were told, “They won’t be ready for a few minutes, but you may as well head over now.”

Now, most people would assume that seminarians stating on their questionnaires that they had chosen to study theology so they could help people and who were then assigned to speak on the Good Samaritan would be the ones most likely to stop and help the ailing man on their way. Interestingly, neither of those two factors seemed to make much of a difference.

In fact, Darley and Batson stated, “Indeed, on several occasions, a seminary student going to give his talk on the parable of the Good Samaritan literally stepped over the victim as he hurried on his way.” The element that seemed to be most influential was whether or not the student was rushed.

Of the students who were told they were already a little late, only 10 percent stopped to help. Of the students who were told they had a little bit more time, 63 percent stopped to help.

We can learn from this example that we can create atmospheres where people are so involved that they ignore other factors they normally would not ignore.  On the flip side, if participants are too relaxed than they become difficult to persuade.

Free Book Offer: Lawsofinfluence.com

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Episode 211 – Persuading Millennials and Gamification – Travis Truett Interview

Join Kurt as he interviews Travis Truett, the CEO of Ambition, the first sales performance management platform built for the modern workforce thats currently endorsed by Google, Harvard Business Review and more.

On this episode they discuss the most common persuasion blunders, how to get in your prospects shoes, biggest changes in the sales & influence world, how to persuade millennials (check out this article), gamification and when it can backfire, why people buy and more!

4 Ways to Inspire Your Millennial Workforce

#1. Encourage Them Regularly Along with Feedback

This group responds well to reinforcement and finds great value by being noticed and receiving recognition for their efforts. Young adults within the workforce are also striving for leadership positions than before. Giving them an impression of being important is likely to make them feel contended and stay with their employers longer because they see the potential for growth.

#2. Offer Millennials Personal Time Along with Flexibility

Millennial’s are particular about having a work-life balance to which they give extra importance. Companies and management that can offer flexible schedules will improve their chances for procuring millennial talent.

#3. Help Millennials Connect to the Business

Organizations and companies are often making mistakes by failing to explain their vision to their employees. Companies are advised not to overlook explaining their values because it helps employees to connect to the overall vision of the employer. Millennial’s have a tendency to look out for methods where they can make a difference and if they are interested in the vision of the employer it will be just the ignition they need to perform better.

#4. Create New Titles Along with Steps In Between

The best ways to inspire your millennial workforce is to create new titles because of their commitment to further their careers. Millennial’s do not prefer waiting for a lengthy period of time for promotions. This is not an indicator for companies to be giving out rewards without reason but considering smaller incentives, as a bonus for a job completed efficiently will be significant. The objective must be to keep the Millennial’s understand they are on the right path.

Offer of the week: Lawsofinfluence.com

For more information about Travis and his work visit ambition.com

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Episode 210 – Double Dissonance – Get People To Persuade Themselves

The Theory of Cognitive Dissonance

Leon Festinger formulated the cognitive dissonance theory at Stanford University. He asserted, “When attitudes or beliefs conflict with our actions, we are uncomfortable and motivated to try to change.” Festinger’s theory sets the foundation for the Law of Dissonance.

The Law of Dissonance proves that people will naturally act in a manner that is consistent with their cognitions. What is a cognition?  Our cognitions is a mental process that uses thoughts, beliefs, experiences, and past perceptions.

Basically that means when people behave in a manner that is inconsistent with these cognitions, (beliefs, thoughts or values) they find themselves in a state of discomfort. In this uncomfortable state, they will be motivated to adjust their behaviors or beliefs to regain mental and emotional balance. When our beliefs, attitudes, and actions mesh, we feel congruent.

When they don’t, we feel dissonance at some level; that is, we feel awkward, uncomfortable, upset, or nervous. In order to eliminate or reduce that tension, we will do everything possible to adjust our beliefs or rationalize our behavior, even if it means doing something we don’t want to do.

Imagine that there is a big rubber band inside of you. When dissonance is present, the rubber band begins to stretch. As long as the dissonance exists, the band stretches tighter and tighter. You’ve got to take action before it reaches a breaking point and snaps.

The motivation to reduce the tension is what causes us to change; we will do everything in our power to get back in mental balance. We like to feel a level of consistency in our day to day actions and interactions.  This harmony is the glue that holds everything together and helps us cope with the world and all the decisions we have to make.

The human brain needs to be right. It is hard for us to admit we are wrong.  We are programmed to justify what we are doing is right and avoid taking responsibilities when things go wrong. It is easier for us to find ways to prove ourselves right (even when we are wrong) then to admit why we are wrong.

Even when backed into a corner or shown evidence that proves we are wrong, we tend to not change our reasoning or point of view.  We will find reasons, proof, or social support why what we did was OK. We will start to believe our lies to ourselves, it couldn’t be our fault and we persuade ourselves why we were justified.

Find all past podcast episodes with a free membership at www.influenceuniversity.com

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Episode 209 – Power and Automatic Behaviors – Interview With Ben Voyer

Join us on this great interview with Dr. Ben Voyer.  We are going to talk about:

How persuasion has changed

Biggest persuasion blunder

Loss avoidance

Power and relationships

Influential nature of stories

Professor Voyer is Loreal Professor of Creativity Marketing ESCP Europe, and visiting fellow London School of Economics. Professor Voyer is a behavioural scientist that has investigated how self-perception and interpersonal relations affect cognition. He has authored & co-authored more than 150 scientific contributions to the field of applied psychology. He has appeared on CNBC, CNN, The Washington Post, The Economist, BBC, Financial Times, BusinessWeek and The Economist. 

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Episode 208 – True Objection or The Knee Jerk Response

Objection Obstacles

All excuses and objections can be boiled down one or more of these seven potential objections:

Once you understand that all objections stem from one or more of these seven key areas, you will have a much easier time identifying the root of your audience’s discomfort. You will then be able to address their objections in a professional, caring, and non-threatening way. Many persuaders (without realizing it) show tension, uneasiness, or irritation when someone brings up an objection. Usually this unrealized conduct occurs because objection stirs up the persuader’s own insecurities (often fear of failure or fear of rejection). The persuader thinks to him or herself, Didn’t I go over that already? I’m doing a good job explaining things! Why is this person still not convinced? Why am I bombing this persuasive encounter? Do I sound like an idiot?” As understandable as this reaction is, it will only makes things worse. Your audience will sense your uneasiness and feel even more uncomfortable. Don’t set off more alarm bells than are already ringing!

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Episode 207 – Blueprint to Business Success

Blueprint to Business is the ultimate guide to becoming a successful entrepreneur. Bestselling author and CEO Mike Alden puts aside the rainbows and sunshine, gets real about what it takes to ‘make it,’ and gives you the real-world guidance you need to hear. Through anecdotes and advice, he shares his experiences along with those of other top founders and entrepreneurs to give you a realistic picture of what it takes to build a business. It’s a bit of tough love, a healthy dose of reality, and a tremendously motivating guide to striking out on your own; from motivation and commitment to business licenses and the IRS, this guide is your personal handbook for the biggest adventure of your career.

 So you want to start a business: how much are you willing to commit in terms of time, money, and energy? How do you plan to bring in customers? What will set you apart from the crowd? What will convince clients to come to you rather than your competitor with an established track record? These questions must be answered before you even begin planning?and then, you have to make that canyon-sized leap from planning to doing. This book guides you through the early stages with practical advice from a real-world perspective.

For more information about Mike and his work visit: thealdenreport.com

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Episode 206 – Do Closing Skills Still Work?

Inside the World of Objections and Concerns

 When you become a great persuader, you will view objections differently than most people do. You will even welcome objections and enjoy handling them. Why? You will realize that when people voice objections, it indicates that they are both mentally interested and emotionally involved in whatever it is you are proposing, even if they are skeptical.

 Interested and involved?what more could a persuader want from their audience? It may be surprising, but when there are no objections during the persuasion process, the persuader’s success rate actually drops dramatically.  It is much better to get objections out in the open than to let them fester.

 Top persuaders do not consider objections or audience concerns as opposition. Rather, they view them as part of the persuasion game. Your audience will naturally delay as long as possible the moment of decision?the moment they need to say yes or no. This stalling can be used to your benefit. Dialogue and exchange of ideas can create a long-term follower, client, or customer.

 Great persuaders may even solve objections before they are voiced. No matter how good you get, objections will be raised, and the truth is that well-handled objections help you persuade. Your persuasiveness depends a lot on how you handle objections and concerns, and you can handle them best if you know what the most common objections are. There are thousands of excuses.   

 Many persuaders (without realizing it) show tension, uneasiness, or irritation when someone brings up an objection. Usually, this unrealized conduct occurs because objection stirs up the persuader’s own insecurities (often fear of failure or fear of rejection).

 The persuader thinks to him or herself, “Didn’t I go over that already? I’m doing a good job explaining things! Why is this person still not convinced? Why am I bombing this persuasive encounter? Do I sound like an idiot?” As understandable as this reaction is, it will only makes things worse. Your audience will sense your uneasiness and feel even more uncomfortable. Don’t set off more alarm bells than are already ringing!

 A calm, natural demeanor opens the door to persuasion and will keep it open in the face of objections. Remember: your audience cannot feel at ease if you don’t. They cannot feel relaxed if you aren’t. They won’t be enthusiastic if you aren’t showing enthusiasm yourself. In a very real way, you must create what you want them to feel.

These oxytocin genes may influence number of friends

You may be as friendly as your genes

 

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