Maximize Your Influence

Persuade Anyone at Anytime

In business and in life, your ability to persuade others can mean the difference between success and failure, or between mere success and spectacular success.…

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Welcome to Our Podcast

Thanks for visiting Maximize Your Influence…your source for the top persuasion, influence, and negotiation techniques that will help you maximize your success in life and in business! Our podcast combines years of persuasion research with current studies and events that will entertain you and supercharge your ability to influence others. Below, you’ll see links to our latest episodes. Underneath the “Latest Podcasts” area, you’ll be able to subscribe to our news letter. The newsletter is the best way to learn about new persuasion research, upcoming events with Kurt and Steve, and great deals on the best persuasion out there! You…

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Kurt Mortensen
Host of Maximize Your Influence

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steve
Steve Olson
Host of Maximize Your Influence

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Latest Podcasts

Episode 159 – Mindless Eating with Brian…

The food industry is now more successful than it has ever been.  Food is cheap and readily accessible, and many of us are eating A LOT of it.  On this episode, Brian Wansink of the of the Food and Brand Lab of Cornell University joins Kurt and Steve.

Brian is a leading expert in changing eating behavior – both on an individual level and on a mass scale – using principles of behavioral science. His research focuses on how ads, packaging, and personality traits influence the usage frequency and usage volume of healthy foods. His research on consumption volume has won national and international awards for its relevance to consumers. His findings have been widely featured on 20/20, BBC News, The Learning Channel, all news networks, and on the front pages of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. He is also  the author of Mindless Eating (2006) and Slim by Design (2014) as well as over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles. From 2007 until 2009 he was appointed by the White House as the USDA’s CNPP Executive Director in charge of the Dietary Guidelines for 2010 and the Food Guide Pyramid (MyPyramid.gov). He is a former bad open-mic comic and rock sax player. He lives with his wife and three girls in Ithaca, New York, where he enjoys both French food and French fries.

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Episode 158 – Hijack A Negotiation Using…

After last weeks interview with Chris Voss, Kurt and Steve dive deeper into negotiations and how emotions can hijack them.  This has a negative connotation with most…but why not be the hijacker here?  Emotions are a powerful tool whether you’re understanding how others are using them, or whether you are using them yourself.

Worry

When your prospect is worried or preoccupied with something occurring now or could happen in the future. The wrong type of worry can hinder persuasion. Worry is feeling anxious, uneasy, or concerned about something that may happen, or has already happened. Worry creates anxiety which creates tension—a fear that occupies our thoughts, which if encouraged will grow and continue to dominate our thoughts. I have heard worry referred to as “negative goal setting.”

You can combat worry in your prospects by modifying their anxiety. Bring them back to reality by having them realize we can’t change many things in the past or forecast the future. Stress that most of the things we worry about are those very things we can’t change or control and which won’t likely ever happen in the first place. Help your prospects replace their negative mental images with positive ones.  Worry can also be caused by indecision.  Get them to make a series of minor decisions and their worry will decrease.

Anger

Anger is a secondary emotion. A prospect’s anger is usually an indicator that something else is askew and that he needs or wants attention.  When we are angry – we want attention or action now. You can assist in diminishing his anger by determining the key issue he is upset about. It is also often effective to ask for his help, opinions, or advice. This will usually diffuse his anger or even change his attitude and demeanor completely. In some circumstances, you may want to use anger to make a certain point or to evoke a certain reaction. However when someone is angry they are more likely to blame someone else. In their mind it is not their fault. When they are sad they will usually blame the situation.

When people become angry they tend to rely on intuition or an educated guess.  Anger triggers non analytical information processing.   Anger causes us to use mental shortcuts to decide if the argument is right.  An experiment was done that induced anger. The participants that were angry tended to discriminate between weak and strong persuasive arguments more than those in a neutral mood.  In other words, those that were angry tended to be more influenced by heuristic cues (intuition) than those in a sad or neutral mood.

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This newsletter is the perfect way for you to improve your influence, sales, self-mastery, negotiation and presentation skills. Packed with new and useful techniques – these are the quickest and easiest way to improve your life, increase your success and explode your income!

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Persuade With Power

At some point, every persuader has lost a client, a customer, or even a friend, has failed at a business, or has blown a new account. Setbacks of this kind have no doubt happened to you. Sure, it hurts, but the question is: Who or what did you blame? It cost you money, embarrassed you, upset you, and someone must be blamed for your discomfort. However, when you embark on a new career, start a new business, or attempt something new, there are risks involved. When things don’t work out as expected, the knee-jerk reaction often is: “Well, this doesn’t work.” I say, “No, it didn’t

work for you this time.  But I know you can make it work.” There are thousands of people in your field or industry, in the same (or worse) circumstances as yours, with the same intelligence (and often less) who have made it work. It is not the vehicle (whether business, real estate, network marketing, the Internet, commissioned sales, or any other endeavor) but the gas (persuasion, people skills, self-mastery) for the vehicle that makes the difference between mediocrity and success.

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